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Celebration of Craftsmanship & Design, Cheltenham, 19-28 August 2017

Woodland Heritage is proud to sponsor the ‘Best Use of British Timber Award’ once again at the Celebration of Craftsmanship & Design, being held at Thirlestaine Long Gallery, Bath Road, Cheltenham, GL53 7LD. The event takes place between Saturday, 19th and Monday, 28th August inclusive, with the gallery open 10am-4pm daily; entrance fees are £3 for under-16s and £6 for adults. Full details can be found at www.celebrationofcraftsmanship.com.

Woodland Heritage is a vehicle for wood users to “put something back” and to contribute to the proper management of British trees. Using British timber encourages the sustainable and economic value of our woodlands, as well as supporting the wood chain. Well-managed, healthy woodlands can also provide an environment that supports wildlife, whilst ensuring traditional woodland skills are not lost.

Woodland Heritage’s prize of £500 will be awarded to the exhibit which demonstrates the best use of British timber, along with a Highly Commended prize of £250. Consideration will be given to “locally grown and locally used” especially where an entrant is able to provide proof, as well as in their use of timber, design and craftsmanship.

The winners, along with their exhibits, will be featured in the charity’s annual Journal.

Last year’s winner was Chris Wiseman (www.wisemanwoodworks.com) for his hand-made sideboard made of British sycamore and oak and which he entitled ‘Oak within’.

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Press Release - July 2017

Two Woodland Heritage trustees recognised in Queen’s Birthday Honours for services to forestry

Two Woodland Heritage trustees, Graham Taylor and Geraint Richards, have been recognised for their outstanding contributions to forestry in the 2017 Queen’s Birthday Honours. Graham has been awarded an MBE for service to forestry, whilst Geraint has been awarded the MVO (Member of The Royal Victorian Order). Between the two of them they have been trustees of Woodland Heritage for over sixteen years.

Graham and Geraint have carved out very successful careers in forestry. Graham is director of the leading forestry consultancy Pryor and Rickett Silviculture, whilst Geraint is Head Forester for the Duchy of Cornwall.

Since both graduating from Bangor University, they have not only excelled in their ‘day jobs’, but have also notched up a huge range of other achievements, working tirelessly on a range of important initiatives, including Woodland Heritage, Future Trees Trust, European Squirrel Initiative and, more recently, they have been key figures in helping to set up the National Tree Improvement Strategy.

They have also maintained close links with their alma mater, Bangor University, during this time, including hosting regular forest visits, giving guest lectures in Bangor and, most importantly, inspiring numerous forestry@bangor students, many of whom have also gone on to attend Woodland Heritage’s Woodland to Workshop course for which Graham and Geraint are two of the tutors.

Lewis Scott, Chairman of trustees of Woodland Heritage commented, “Woodland Heritage is very proud to learn of this deserved recognition for Graham and Geraint, marking the great success they have achieved in their careers. Our charity is blessed to have such driving forces in the forestry industry as both advisors to our charity and as volunteers, ready to roll their sleeves up and help lead events such as our annual Field Weekend, at which our members learn so much. They also enable our charity to get involved in important initiatives individually, with Graham taking a leading role in the recent ‘Realising the Value of your Hardwoods’ film and Geraint giving us the chance to bring our longstanding work on AOD to the collective benefit of ongoing tree health work in the UK.”

ABOUT THE AWARDEES:

Geraint Richards. Head Forester, Duchy of Cornwall

Geraint studied at Bangor University from 1988-1992, including a year out with the FC in Thetford Forest and graduated with BSc Forestry (First Class Honours). He subsequently spent four years working for the Forestry Commission in Kent and Sussex and was then delighted to be appointed as Head Forester for the Duchy of Cornwall in 1996. He is now responsible for the management of the woodlands and forests across the Duchy of Cornwall’s landholding, some 5,000 acres of woodland altogether from shelterbelts on the Isles of Scilly to coniferous stands in Cornwall and high-quality ancient semi-natural woodlands in Herefordshire. He is currently involved with a wide range of U.K. and international forestry organisations and initiatives including Woodland Heritage (trustee), Future Trees Trust (co-chairman with Graham Taylor) and the UK Squirrel Accord plus on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Institute of Forestry. Geraint is particularly keen to see more young people enter and enjoy the forestry profession. Geraint lives in Cornwall and is married to Anne with five children. He is a passionate follower of the Welsh rugby team!

Graham Taylor. Director, Pryor and Rickett Silviculture

Graham studied at Bangor University from 1986-1990 and graduated with a Joint Honours in Forestry & Soil Science (making him one of those rare foresters who understands the medium that trees grow in). During his time at Bangor, he was instrumental in lobbying for theforestry@bangor degrees to include an optional year-long placement, which have remained ever since as a vital component of these degree programmes. Graham spent his year with the Forestry Commission. After graduating, he initially worked for Fountain Forestry in Hay-on-Wye. He then joined Pryor & Rickett Sliviculture (PRS) in 1993 as Assistant Forest Manager, becoming director in 1998 and have helping steer growth from a base of 2,500 hectares to about 20,000 ha of privately owned forestry which PRS manage / advise on behalf of some 350 private clients. Graham is a Trustee of Woodland Heritage and Co-Chairman of Future Trees Trust (with Geraint Richards). He is also on the management committee of European Squirrel Initiative (ESI) who are working on improving the extent and efficacy of grey squirrel control measures. Graham is regularly invited to speak at regional and national conferences and events. As well as the above he aims to spend time with family, keep fit (running / cycling) and is also involved in church work, running a youth group and other responsibilities. Three words sum Graham up in a nutshell: ‘Family, Faith & Forestry’.

ABOUT WOODLAND HERITAGE:

Woodland Heritage was established as a charity in 1994 by two cabinet makers keen to ‘put something back’. A membership-based organisation, the charity supports the resilient management of woodlands, the development of the timber supply chain, the furthering of knowledge and skills within the forestry and timber sectors as well as within the general public, and the tackling of threats to the future supply of high quality UK timber. As well as running the popular ‘From Woodland to Workshop’ courses and a Field Weekend each year, Woodland Heritage produces an annual Journal. A current priority for the charity is supporting research into Acute Oak Decline. HRH The Prince of Wales has been the Patron of Woodland Heritage since 2005.

For more information on this release, please contact Guy Corbett-Marshall, Development Director, Woodland Heritage on 07816-384221.

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Wild service tree silviculture better understood after German tour

Wild service treesilviculture better understood after German tour

A Woodland Heritage funded tour of some of the finest sites in Germany for wild service tree has boosted UK-forestry knowledge of this potential alternative hardwood species. Planned and co-ordinated by forestry consultant, Christopher Guest, other attendees were Nick Marsh, a National Trust employee whose current Masters dissertation is focused on wild service, and Miles Barne, who is undertaking silvicultural trials on wild service in woodland on the Sotterley Estate in Suffolk.

Classed as a medium priority species in the Sustainable Seed Source Project’s report of 2015, wild service is recognised as having future timber potential, but its uptake is low in the UK with its form and productivity failing to match what has been achieved over the centuries in countries such as Germany and France.

“The three days spent in Germany (with a brief visit to France too) sought to boost the group’s knowledge of the potential for wild service in the UK, whilst at the same time being realistic about the risks of growing this much-overlooked species,” said group leader, Christopher Guest. “Thankfully, in areas such as North Frankonia in Bavaria, when the risks are overcome the rewards can be amazing with some of the most expensive veneer logs ever sold coming from the wild service grown in that region.”

Whilst oak is the main species in the University Forest District, Sailershausen, wild service contributes substantially to economic revenue attracting many study groups wanting to learn more about its silviculture. The Woodland Heritage funded group tackled topics such as seed collection, seeds versus suckers, planting (whether as patterns, pure or mixtures and densities), artificial or natural pruning, tending, thinning, diseases, markets and target diameters, all helping to understand how the finest wild service trees can reach 33m in 110 years.Genetic quality was also of major importance to the group, especially when considering the potential for sourcing for planting trials.

“The principal management aim in the Sotterley woodland is the production of fine quality oak timber,” said woodland manager, Miles Barne. “The estate’s interest in wild service results from an awareness that the principal hardwood species grown in Britain have recently become more vulnerable to diseases, some devastating for example, elm and ash. Oak at Sotterley already suffer from Acute Oak Decline and another mystery disease as yet unidentified. It therefore seems prudent to hedge the estate’s bets in a very small way by experimenting with minor species. The Estate has started with wild service by establishing simple trial plots to test how the species will grow in mixture with oak and also pure. It is hoped that more sophisticated trials can be established in time including, for example, a comparison of provenances and perhaps varied mixtures as seen at Sailershausen.”

As well as the visit to Sailershausen, the study tour also visited Lillientahl-Freiburg to view and discuss a provenance trial established in 1979 and to learn from the successes achieved and challenges presented in this experiment. The third visit was to forests in Saarland and Lorraine where natural regeneration of wild service has been occurring for many decades in principally mixed oak and hornbeam stands. The continuous cover management strategy in both of these regions is strictly focused on the production of premium quality timber.

Editor’s Notes:

For more information on this release, please contact Guy Corbett-Marshall, Development Director, Woodland Heritage on 07816-384221.

Woodland Heritage was established as a charity in 1994 by two cabinet makers keen to ‘put something back’. A membership-based organisation, the charity supports the resilient management of woodlands, the development of the timber supply chain, the furthering of knowledge and skills within the forestry and timber sectors as well as within the general public, and the tackling of threats to the future supply of high quality UK timber. As well as running the popular ‘From Woodland to Workshop’ courses and a Field Weekend each year, Woodland Heritage produces an annual Journal. A current priority for the charity is supporting research into Acute Oak Decline.

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RFS Forestry Skills Study

Study to establish what skills are needed for the future of forestry

The Royal Forestry Society on behalf of the Forestry Skills Forum has appointed RDI Associates Ltd to undertake a sector skills study that will help to identify the skills gaps and shortages, training provision and future needs of the forestry industry in England and Wales.

The study will take place over the coming months and will focus on the forest establishment, management and harvesting sub-sectors to provide an evidence base that will allow a skills action plan to be developed.

Funding and in-kind support for the study has been provided by the Royal Forestry Society, Forestry Commission England, Woodland Heritage, the Scottish Forestry Trust and the National School of Forestry, University of Cumbria.

RDI Associates will be liaising with Higher and Further Education institutions, undertaking desk top research and conducting a new survey over the summer which will focus on interviews with employers and industry stakeholders.

“A key priority for the forestry sector is to achieve continued growth and the increase in active management of existing woodlands; this requires a workforce that is skilled and responsive to future opportunities and demands for the forestry sector," said RFS Education Manager, Ted Wilson.

“Statistical and anecdotal evidence suggests that the forestry sector is not recruiting enough new entrants to replace the increasing number of employees approaching retirement age. We are concerned that an emerging skills shortage may limit the growth potential of the forestry sector. We are delighted that RDI Associates will be working with us to establish the extent of this shortfall and point the way forward for employers and education providers”.

RDI Associates Ltd has brought together a team of experts to tackle this challenging study, who between them have a hundred years’ experience working in the forestry sector across a wide range of disciplines and with a broad geographic spread.

“The team undertaking the skills survey has extensive experience of engaging with forest owners, managers and contractors in an industry that is characterised by its micro- and small businesses”, said RDIA’s Director, Will Richardson. “Our extensive experience of analysing the needs of forestry businesses and translating the evidence gathered into strategic documents will help get to the bottom of potential barriers to employment in the sector such as pay and conditions, the attractiveness of the jobs and whether there are recognised career opportunities and progression pathways”.

The study will focus on the forest establishment, management and harvesting sub-sectors and will involve liaison with both Higher and Further Education institutions. The results of the study are expected to be announced before the end of the year.

Editors’ Notes:

The purpose of the Forestry Skills Forum is to:

• agree collective, collaborative and individual actions across industry and other organisations on priority skills issues

• share information

• provide a unified voice for advocating and promoting education, learning and development in forestry

Activity will focus on:

• Improving/promoting the image of the sector, providing information and attracting new talent
• Workforce development
• Labour Market Intelligence
• Further/Higher Educational provision

The group’s objective is to be a collective voice across the sector on skills:

• Supporting the development and delivery of a Skills Action Plan, and the Actions within it
• Challenging and encouraging industry to take the lead with the skills agenda
• Identifying gaps and duplications in provision, and taking actions to address them
• Informing and influencing on skills issues including qualification development and professional/educational interaction
• Making representations on education, learning and development issues on behalf of the sector e.g. at APF, and holding Grown in Britain Week events
• Communication, liaison and where appropriate joint working with Scotland and Wales, reflecting the ‘borderless’ nature of the forestry industry

Royal Forestry Society

1. The Royal Forestry Society (RFS) is the largest and longest established educational charity promoting the wise management of trees and woods in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.”
2. For information go to www.rfs.org.uk. Follow us: Twitter: @royal_forestry, Facebook: Royal Forestry Society – RFS, Linked- In: Royal Forestry Society

Additional contacts:

Guy Marshall, Woodland Heritage, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Tel 07816-384221

Mark Tomlinson, National School of Forestry, University of Cumbria: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Tel 015394 30622

Will Richardson, RDI Associates: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Tel 01765 609355.

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Press Release - June 2017

Top Suffolk forester Winner of the 2017 Peter Savill Award

Four decades of significant contribution to the benefit of the British Forestry Industry has been recognised by a national charity. During its annual Field Weekend in June, Woodland Heritage was delighted to present Suffolk County Council’s Woodland Advisor, Gary Battell, with its Peter Savill Award, only the eleventh time such an accolade has been given.

The criteria for the Peter Savill Award are that the contribution to forestry made by the individual selected annually by the trustees of Woodland Heritage must be in sympathy with the charity’s objectives and in one of five areas of forestry: silviculture, marketing, education, wood processing and research.

At the Woodland Heritage Trustees’ December meeting then Chairman and Co-Founder, Peter Goodwin’s, nomination was read out: “True passion can engage and inspire action. Gary Battell certainly is passionate about trees, the wildlife they support and the bluebells they shelter. I commend Gary’s nomination for the 2017 Peter Savill Award”.

Speaking at the presentation, Managing Trustee and Co-Founder, Lewis Scott said: “In recognition of Gary’s contribution to forestry through the giving of his time selflessly in the cause of tree health, woodland management, woodworking and education, Woodland Heritage Trustees were unanimous in awarding him their prestigious Peter Savill Award and his name is added to a growing list of greats within the industry”.

Gary’s love of trees originated in his time as a Boy Scout whilst living in a children’s home for the first fourteen years of his life. He has worked in woodland and park management since 1975 including posts with the Forestry Commission, the National Trust and, since 1998, as Woodland Advisor to Suffolk County Council.

He was a founding member of the Ancient Tree Forum, sits on the Regional Committee of the Royal Geographical Society and the Committee of the Royal Forestry Society’s East Anglian Division.

His enduring friendship with the late Dr Oliver Rackham brought him additional landscape history and ecology knowledge which he now passes on to a wide audience. He is a valued adviser to numerous organisations as well as helping individuals to get into forestry or set up their own businesses.

During such spare time as he has, Gary supports the management of Staverton Park, with its 4,000 magnificent Oaks in an ancient deer park. In the nearby small Woodland Heritage tree nursery he raises acorns to supplement the site with young Oaks.

Since his attendance at Forest Research’s inaugural meeting to discuss what Dr Sandra Denman had just named “Acute Oak Decline” (AOD) he has been closely involved in the work at Alice Holt earning huge respect and appreciation. He continues to play a leading practical role in the filming of the AOD research film.

Editor’s Notes:

Woodland Heritage was established as a charity in 1994 by two cabinet makers keen to ‘put something back’. A membership-based organisation, the charity supports the resilient management of woodlands, the development of the timber supply chain, the furthering of knowledge and skills within the forestry and timber sectors as well as within the general public, and the tackling of threats to the future supply of high quality UK timber. As well as running the popular ‘From Woodland to Workshop’ courses and a Field Weekend each year, Woodland Heritage produces an annual Journal. A current priority for the charity is supporting research into Acute Oak Decline.

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Press Release - June 2017

Stunning addition to popular trail in Dunkeld unveiled

A memorial bench with a twist has been unveiled on the banks of the River Tay at Dunkeld to remember Sydney Draper, a former forester to the World Bank who died in July 2015 aged 90.

The new bench in the grounds of Dunkeld House Hotel was commissioned by Woodland Heritage to commemorate Mr Draper, a long-standing supporter of the charity. It has been carefully crafted to appear as though it is twisted and made of several different sections of timber, whereas it has actually been crafted from a single piece of native oak by localartist Nigel Ross.

Mr Ross’s creations may be found throughout the UK, from London’s Canary Wharf to the Ness Islands in Inverness.

It was through Mr Draper’s generous support of Woodland Heritage that the charity was able to support the renovation of Dunkeld’s ‘Big Tree Trail’ in partnership with the National Tree Collections of Scotland and the Perth & Kinross Countryside Trust. Woodland Heritage Trustees felt it was a fitting memorial to Mr Draper to commission the new piece by Nigel Ross to sit on the banks of the Tay at Dunkeld.

Tom Christian, a Trustee of Woodland Heritage, said:

“Sydney loved Dunkeld and returned here on his 90th birthday to plant a commemorative tree. Environmental education was very important to him, which is why he made his generous gift to help support the costs of a new tree trail here at Dunkeld, to tell visitors the amazing stories of the trees around us, the landscape they sit in, and how vital trees and healthy forests are to life on earth.

We are enormously grateful to Sydney, and to Dunkeld House Hotel and Land Rover Experience Scotland for their help in making this fitting memorial possible”.

Visitors to Dunkeld will now be able to sit and rest a while, courtesy of Sydney Draper, as they enjoy the idyllic riverside walks by the Tay.

Editors Notes:

1. Woodland Heritage was established as a charity in 1994 by two cabinet makers keen to ‘put something back’. A membership-based organisation, the charity supports the resilient management of woodlands, the development of the timber supply chain, the furthering of knowledge and skills within the forestry and timber sectors as well as within the general public, and the tackling of threats to the future supply of high quality UK timber. As well as running the popular ‘From Woodland to Workshop’ courses and a Field Weekend each year, Woodland Heritage produces an annual Journal. A current priority for the charity is supporting research into Acute Oak Decline.

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Peter Goodwin

It is with much sadness that we report Peter passed away on 18 March. Peter was the Chair of Woodland Heritage, the ex-Director of long standing and highly respected family firm of cabinet furniture makers Titchmarsh and Goodwin, and a champion of British timber.

In 1994, Peter felt it was time to “give something back to the forestry sector”, to try and help safeguard British woodlands for future generations and future furniture makers.  To further his vision he co-founded Woodland Heritage – a charity that works to revive and embrace our woodland culture.  As Chairman of Woodland Heritage, Peter worked tirelessly for over 23 years, securing its founding, the patronage of HRH The Prince of Wales and inspired its numerous activities. Through Peter's endless personal enthusiasm and passion, the charity developed its highly successful 'Woodland to Workshop' courses, communicated the importance of woodland management at numerous field visits and raised awareness across the sector and within Government of the threats to British woodlands. Peter was able, combining his charm and diplomacy with his business acumen, to secure over £2 million for research into Acute Oak Decline. In 2011 he was awarded the Royal Forestry Society’s (RFS) most prestigious award, the RFS Gold Medal for Distinguished Services to Forestry.

Peter was enthusiastic and thrived on getting things done – the embodiment – and originator of - Woodland Heritage’s mantra of 'Action not Words'. He was outspoken in his views and was never afraid to highlight what he felt needed doing - and what did not – and revelled in being direct in his views. There are many people who will recall Peter’s jocular yet challenging chairing of Woodland Heritage’s field meetings – and when Peter was holding the microphone there was always going to be a series of interesting asides, challenges to conventional thought as well as encyclopaedic attention to detail and knowledge. Peter was always willing to say what many others thought, but were not confident in doing so, but Peter always spoke with great conviction, fairness and a steely glint in his eye. He was also a great company, a passionate communicator and time spent in his company was always richly rewarding. He was great fun to be with. Peter was an inspiration to all that met him and he will be sorely missed by all who knew him. Our sincerest condolences go to Peter’s wife, Sally, and his family.

 

A celebration of Peter's life will take place at Sotterley Hall, Sotterley, Beccles, Suffolk. NR34 7TY on Monday 3rd April at 2.00 pm. 

The family have requested - no flowers please, but donations, if desired, to Woodland Heritage.

 

If you would like to make a donation and are able to Gift Aid it then please use the attached form here.

For any queries or further information please use the contact details below;

Woodland Heritage, PO Box 168, Haslemere, Surrey. GU27 1XQ.

Tel: 01428 652159 Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Woodland Heritage
P.O. Box 168
Haslemere
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GU27 1XQ
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